Latest News

River Guardians advocate for the river

Looking for a place to direct friends or family interested in advocating for the river, check out our new River Guardians page. You can take action, check out previous action alerts and FMR's advocacy letters on behalf of members, and see a map (soon to be interactive!) of FMR's current advocacy projects.

And, of course, if you haven't already, you can sign up to be an FMR River Guardian.

August 2017
River Heights Park, Inver Grove Heights

Part of our local national park — River Heights Park in Inver Grove Heights — is no longer slated to be turned into lots for private homes.

The city of Inver Grove Heights was considering selling River Heights Park, part of our local Mississippi River national park, for housing. But neighbors stepped up to defend it, and with a little support from FMR, the park has been preserved!

Inver Grove Heights is a valued FMR habitat restoration partner and we look forward to continuing our work together.

August 2017

Ever wonder what keeps FMR ecologists up at night? Buckthorn and crown vetch may have pretty glossy leaves or flowers, but for anyone who cares about wildlife, they're a serious threat to forest and prairie habitat in the metro river corridor.

Join FMR ecologist Alex Roth for a walk through our most common invasives: buckthorn, bush honeysuckle, garlic mustard, burdock, spotted knapweed and crown vetch. Along the way, you'll learn why they matter and how to identify and remove them in your own back yard. All in two minutes!

Thank you Tom Reiter and Will Stock for creating this wonderful video!

August 2017

The aptly named hummingbird moth or clearwing moth is not uncommon, but with its beautiful colors and wing patterns, it's a delight to see one hovering over flowers seeking nectar.

August 2017

"Lonesome Whistle" (the photo above) inspired a surprising diversity of prose and poetry for the summer 2017 edition of Write to the River. Enjoy flash tales of near-misses, tense crossings, goddesses in sandstone cliffs, fond recollections and a prayer from the Big River itself.

Thank you, authors and poets Jim Larson, Captain Bob Deck, Winnie Martin, Connie Baker and Judie Erickson!

July 2017

In the heart of Dakota County, surrounded by farm fields, rises Hampton Woods. The only forest for miles in all directions, the woods provides critical habitat for forest-dwelling animals, especially birds.

Thanks to an FMR partnership with local landowners, Dakota County and the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, 191 acres of Hampton Woods has been permanently protected and is now open to the public as a wildlife management area. Check it out, and enjoy the hawk's eye view!

July 2017
Harding High Earth Club

Chao Xiong (left) and Aliya Mohamed (right) enjoy giving back to their community by preserving the river.

We're so excited that the Harding High Earth Club is on the cover of this month's Hmong Times for their work with FMR! These young citizen scientists and habitat restorers have been essential to our work at Indian Mounds Regional Park and at the riverfront forest below it in East St. Paul. 

July 2017
Matt Cook and John Czyscon

Matt Cook (left) and John Czyscon (right) 

FMR is delighted to welcome communications intern Matt Cook and development associate John Czyscon to the FMR family!

July 2017

When the Environmental Protection Agency’s chief of staff pressured Deborah Swackhamer, the top scientist on the agency’s scientific review board, to alter her congressional testimony to play down President Trump's dismissal of expert advisers, Swackhamer stood strong.

We didn't think it was possible, but we are more proud than ever to have Ms. Swackhamer on FMR's Council of Advisors. Learn more from the New York Times, MPR, MSNBC and Science magazine.

July 2017
Check out that pointy abdomen!

As young bees and wasps mature, you're more likely to spot this unusual pollinator: a pelecinid.
Photo by Kristin Lee, Creative Commons license

Of the 18,000 species of ants, bees and wasps in North America, the pelecinid wasp is among the most interesting. This insect is so unusual it shares its family (Pelecinidae) with just three other species in the world, with no others in North America. But don't worry, that 'stinger' isn't what it looks like.

July 2017

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