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As our climate changes and water infrastructure ages, the challenges of water management are becoming more severe. Ultimately, our changing climate means that Minnesota faces more — and more powerful — storms, leading to sewage emergencies, mega-storms, sandbagged lake houses and twelve billion-dollar price tags.  >>

September 2019

A new deterrent system installed 50 miles north of our border with Iowa is a promising effort to stop invasive carp in Minnesota. But a dozen invasive carp were found in the Mississippi and St. Croix rivers this year, further evidence that these destructive fish are growing in numbers in our state. Can we stop them before it's too late?  >>

September 2019

We've trained a wildlife camera's eye on our turtle nest protection area in the Spring Lake Islands Wildlife Management Area near Rosemount. The camera's shots will help us find out if the nest enclosure is working to protect hatchlings. But as we dig through our footage, we're turning up some fun shots of more than just turtles.  >>

September 2019

The riverfront north of St. Anthony Falls in Minneapolis is changing rapidly. In this Star Tribune feature, Janet Moore quickly covers this transformation through a transportation lens. It’s an excellent overview, and curious readers can learn more about this story here.  >>

September 2019

The Army Corps of Engineers is currently considering options to repurpose or maintain the Upper St. Anthony lock. A second part of this same study, beginning next year, will look at removing Lower St. Anthony Falls and the Ford dam. Over 100 people went to the first public input meetings about this study, including us. Missed them? Learn what we learned and weigh in with written comments by October 20.  >>  

September 2019

Minnesota Public Radio recently highlighted a World Health Organization study on microplastics in drinking water. The conclusion: “…levels of microplastics in drinking water don't appear to be risky, but that research has been spotty and more is needed into their effects on the environment and health.”  >>
 

September 2019
Endangered speces at FMR sites

A trio of endangered species found at FMR conservation and restoration sites. Left to right: Loggerhead shrike, Blanchard's cricket frog and Henslow's sparrow. (Photos by Terry Ross, Greg Schecter and Jim Hudgins/USFWS.)

Endangered species, fishers, fields of monarchs — FMR ecologists encounter them all at our 37 habitat restoration sites.  

On our new conservation blog, learn more about what our ecologists see in the field, the special places we're working to protect and how we restore habitat. >>

September 2019

A lone male rusty patched bumblebee found in August at an FMR-restored savanna represents 0.2 percent of the known population worldwide. Necessary not only for native wildflower reproduction, but also for creating seeds and fruits that feed wildlife as diverse as songbirds and bears, our state bee could use your help. >>

September 2019
An Evening Celebrating the Mississippi River featuring Nick Spitzer and Jearlyn Steel

Get ready for a journey downriver connecting music and culture of the Mississippi from the headwaters to the mouth. Register for An Evening Celebrating the Mississippi River by September 23!

An Evening Celebrating the Mississippi River on October 3 will feature public radio’s producer of "American Routes" Nick Spitzer who will take us on a journey from the headwaters down south to the mouth through music and storytelling. WCCO's Jearlyn Steele returns to the stage as our emcee>>

September 2019
One of the program participants removes invasive species on a rainy day at Trout Brook Nature Sanctuary

Naomi Nickel, one of the participants in the Youth Empowerment Program, removes invasive species on a rainy day at Trout Brook Nature Sanctuary. The program features a mix of hands-on experiences, guest speakers, discussions and projects to help students learn more and build skills in the environmental field.

Through canoe trips, guest speakers, pollinator surveys and more this summer, we worked with high-school aged youth from the metro area to explore career possibilities and build skills in the environmental field. Learn more about our new Youth Empowerment Program and see these leaders' capstone projects (which included monarchs, jars of river water, and even a baby painted turtle).  >>

September 2019

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