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FMR Updates

New Pig's Eye Lake islands on the way!

From road work to new buildings, construction projects are a constant for most Twin Cities residents. Soon, a new type of project is coming to St. Paul: seven small islands within Pig's Eye Lake.

We look forward to their benefits for wildlife, reduced erosion and climate change research. >>

April 13

FMR members make a difference for Twin Cities Coyote and Fox Project

Hundreds of you responded to our call to support a U of M study to better understand canid species and how they use the urban metro. Now that the first field season is complete, we chatted with Nick McCann of the Twin Cities Coyote and Fox Project to hear about how the year went and how FMR members played an important role in its success.  >>

April 7

A field guide to the new river rules for advocates, planners and city officials

Starting this year, each metro river city and town will update its laws guiding local riverfront development. These updates will be important tools for communities that want to shape the river for years to come.

We’ve pulled together a field guide for this Mississippi River Corridor Critical Area ordinance process — complete with briefings, videos, maps, updates for your city and more — to help you stay informed and involved.  >>

We're working remotely. Stay safe and be well!

A heron passes nest building material to its mate

Herons building their nest at a metro Mississippi River rookery. Photo by Steven Cronin.

Friends of the Mississippi River staff are working remotely, events are canceled through at least May, and we will continue to follow official guidelines to reduce the spread of the coronavirus.

More importantly, we wish everyone peace and wellness in these uncertain times. Let's support one another, in whatever ways we can, through this public health emergency. >>

March 16

Counting critters at Pine Bend Bluffs, our longest-running restoration

Over the last 20 years at Pine Bend Bluffs, we've converted a buckthorn forest to oak savanna and a Siberian elm canopy to prairie. Now we're monitoring the site to see how wildlife is responding. Since we restore lands largely to benefit animals (and plants), documenting critters is a valuable measure of success. And survey says: We've been pretty successful.  >>

March 9

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