You are here

FMR Updates

Our storied river: Call for storytelling submissions

Hands hold water that flows into a river. A person speaks. Text: Our Storied River

If you have a story about how the Mississippi River changed you, we want to hear it — in your voice. At our Moth-esque virtual gala this fall, we'll showcase tales from diverse voices and varied experiences that dazzle, twist, flood us or still us. Tell us yours by July 24.  >>

Location

Virtual
United States
US
May 19

Growing diversity for climate resiliency in Minneapolis riverfront forests

In a gravel-bed nursery that captures stormwater at the Mississippi Watershed Management Organization’s office, we’re growing tree species predicted to do well as Minnesota's climate warms. These bare-root trees will be ready to plant at our habitat restoration sites this fall, where they’ll strengthen the resiliency of our riverfront canopy.  >>

May 13

A fond farewell to staffer Adam Flett

Adam Flett paddles a canoe

In his eight years at FMR, Adam Flett managed our 44-mile river adventure for hundreds of paddlers, taught metro residents how to construct rain barrels, pulled invasives and planted for habitat alongside many of you, and always brought good tunes and good humor to our staff events. We wish our stewardship and education program director all the best in his next adventure.  >>

May 11

Meet FMR's 2020 Youth Empowerment Program assistants

Ayva and Naomi

Ayva and Naomi, part of last year's inaugural Youth Empowerment Program group, will be this year's assistants.

Summer program assistants Ayva Sloo and Naomi Nickel share how their Minnesotan roots and last year's Youth Empowerment Program have impacted their career aspirations and connection to local environmental issues.  >>

The untold story of our national park's founding

You may know that the Mississippi River through the Twin Cities is a national park. But few of us know how our special river became a national park in the first place. We interviewed National Park Superintendent John Anfinson about the development proposal that started the fight to protect our park and the surprising role that this exact same site — the potential home for a new River Learning Center — could play in its future.  >>

Become a community scientist

Scientists sometimes turn to the public to collect observations and data on flora and fauna. If you’re heading outside, why not take note of the wildlife and blooms you see? Here are a few of our favorite projects that call for community scientists.  >>

April 28

Caring for the river and one another this spring

Picking up trash on a local walk (solo and wearing gloves)

We've pulled together ideas about how to celebrate Earth Day all month for supporters like you to act on your values and enjoy moments of positive impact during this tough time. So whether you're up for advocating online, collecting litter or you just need a moment to be still and witness the migrating birds, we look forward to celebrating Earth Month with you — separately, but together.  >>

April 13

Pages