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River Corridor

Area C: The overlooked Ford site

Did you know that Ford Motor Company owns a hazardous waste dump right on the river's edge in the middle of St. Paul? FMR has been a longtime advocate to clean up this site. As the process ramps up in the coming months, we'll need you to join us in taking action.  >>

September 8

Area C solar project could jeopardize dumpsite cleanup

A planned solar array on top of the Ford Area C dumpsite sounds appealing, but poor timing for the solar project could jeopardize cleanup of the toxic site. Our recent letter in the Highland Villager explains why we're concerned.  >>

July 13

FMR board member writes in Star Trib: Revamp the Upper Harbor project

Bicyclists ride among abandoned industrial structures at the Upper Harbor Terminal site.

In a recent Star Tribune commentary, FMR board member Paul Bauknight and Reverend Robin Bell call for a new approach for Minneapolis's Upper Harbor Terminal riverfront redevelopment — one that truly centers community design and wealth building rather than the current project's "public funding for white-owned business wrapped in the holy cloth of equitable development." >>

Is Upper Harbor Terminal Minneapolis's best rebuilding idea?


Our concerns about state bonds for Upper Harbor Terminal are nothing new (see the video above from Fox 9 in late 2019). But in light of recent events, we're more concerned than ever. Is public funding for First Avenue's privately-operated concert venue at Upper Harbor Terminal still a priority for Minneapolis leaders? Learn more and take action now. >>

What's been happening at Area C?

The official process for cleaning up a hazardous waste site like Ford Area C in St. Paul takes time, and it can be tough to keep up with the developments. Here’s a summary of what you (FMR supporters) have helped accomplish towards a better future at this floodplain waste dump so far, and what's still to come.  >>

The untold story of our national park's founding

You may know that the Mississippi River through the Twin Cities is a national park. But few of us know how our special river became a national park in the first place. We interviewed National Park Superintendent John Anfinson about the development proposal that started the fight to protect our park and the surprising role that this exact same site — the potential home for a new River Learning Center — could play in its future.  >>

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