Invasive plants

Forests, prairies and savannas all work best when they're shared. But invasive species spread rapidly and make it hard for other plants to grow — plants that help hold soil in place, plants where birds nest, plants that make up vibrant, interconnected habitat.

Overgrowth of invasive species can cause habitat breakdown, erosion of soil into waterways, the spread of plant diseases and more. That's why we focus so much on removing invasive species and replacing them with diverse plants at our restoration sites. Join us!

Invasive plants
How our warm winter affected habitat restoration progress
What will the warmest winter on record mean for wildlife? We won't know for awhile. We do know that it got in the way of our usual winter tasks for wildlife habitat restoration. Luckily, our ecologists like challenges. Read more
Open river with snow along the banks
Can pockets of habitat tip the scales in degraded wetlands?
Invasive reed canary grass forms dense monocultures in many wetlands across the Upper Midwest, but we're experimenting with ways to give native wetland plants a better foothold. Read more
Vermillion River flows through reed canary grass
Media shines spotlight on FMR staff and creative solutions for vexing river issues
Whether clean-water crops, carp or buckthorn, the expertise of FMR staff has been on full display. Read more
FMR staff, camelina, carp, buckthorn
A new tool in our toolbox for buckthorn control: Critical period cutting
We're always looking for new and better ways to keep buckthorn from becoming dominant in our woodlands and forests. A new method we're trying in the Gorge shows promise and doesn't require power tools or herbicides. Read more
Volunteers work on buckthorn removal by the river
More hope for long-term buckthorn control
New research shows that seeding and planting after buckthorn removal can help keep future buckthorn growth at bay. But not all plantings are created equal. Read more about FMR Conservation Director Alex Roth's latest research. Read more
FMR ecologists and interns monitor invasive honeysuckle removal plots.
"Is it good or bad?" Rethinking language around invasive species
A deep dive into the term "invasive species" — species that spread rapidly, or species out of place — plus how we can revise the value judgments we place on them. Read more
Invasive species: Garlic mustard
Learn more about garlic mustard and how you can help restore balance for wildlife and water quality by removing these plants before they flower. Read more
Garlic mustard plants and stems

Pages

Upcoming Events

Saturday, April 20 - 9:30 AM to Noon
West River Parkway and 36th Street/44th Street, Minneapolis
Applications due Friday, May 3 by 5 p.m.
Virtual and in-person
Wednesday, May 8, 2024 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm
Hampton Woods Wildlife Management Area