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Stewardship

Check out our first mural for water quality!

Saint Paul's first storm-drain mural!

FMR worked closely with neighborhood groups and local artist Gustavo Lira to design St. Paul's first storm-drain mural. The koi fish represents Como Park Zoo & Conservatory, the music notes Como Dockside and the snapping turtle Como Lake.

When you think of a storm drain, what do you see? The concrete of the street, perhaps a metal grate. How about a pathway to our local lakes or the Mighty Mississippi? Or a large beautiful painting that helps illustrate this connection with our local waters?

Now you can check out such a work of art along Como Lake in St. Paul. The result of an 18-month collaborative partnership, the new mural is the first of its kind in St. Paul, possibly in the metro. >>

October 7

Walk amongst the invaders (video)

Ever wonder what keeps FMR ecologists up at night? Buckthorn and crown vetch may have pretty glossy leaves or flowers, but for anyone who cares about wildlife, they're a serious threat to forest and prairie habitat in the metro river corridor.

Join FMR ecologist Alex Roth for a walk through our most common invasives: buckthorn, bush honeysuckle, garlic mustard, burdock, spotted knapweed and crown vetch. Along the way, you'll learn why they matter and how to identify and remove them in your own back yard. All in two minutes!

Thank you Tom Reiter and Will Stock for creating this wonderful video!

August 7

Wanted: SuperVolunteers!

SuperVolunteers Stacy & Allan

SuperVolunteers Stacy Enzmann and Allan Tokuda preserve wildlife habitat by removing invasive buckthorn at an FMR event. (By Anna Botz Photography)

If you've been to an FMR event, chances are you've encountered a SuperVolunteer wearing their identifying T-shirt with pride. To join their ranks (complete with a coveted T-shirt and special event invitations) volunteers need to participate in four or more hands-on restoration events or contribute 20 hours total throughout the year.

There are still plenty of upcoming events in need of helping hands to attain SuperVolunteer status! Check out the FMR event calendar or contact Volunteer Coordinator Amy Kilgore, akilgore@fmr.org, to get started.

August 1

Out of the classroom and into the weeds, woods ... and worms?

Clare shows off the large ragweed plant she pulled out of the native planting at Crosby Farm Park.

This massive ragweed plant is no match for Clare Tipler, the senior from St. Paul Academy who contributed the article below about her experience with FMR field trips. Clare and her class removed invasives from Crosby Park in St. Paul (above), educated their neighbors about river pollution and became citizen scientists for the Mississippi River.

High school senior Clare Tipler shares her adventures working with FMR and her environmental studies class and the surprising lessons learned along the way.

January 3

Thank you, volunteers! Plus, the best photos from our 2016 event season

Volunteers planting native shrubs along the River Gorge

FMR stewardship volunteers planting native shrubs along the River Gorge in south Minneapolis. The native plants will provide much-needed urban wildlife habitat for birds, pollinators and other critters, and also help prevent erosion. 

The number of Twin Citians passionate about the Mississippi River never ceases to amaze us. In 2016, over 3,700 people pitched in at 98 FMR volunteer events. It was an honor to work with each of you.

Whether you spent a couple of hours picking up trash with us on Earth Day, hauled brush on a Saturday morning, took the "pledge to pull" this spring, or earned full FMR SuperVolunteer status participating in several events throughout the year, thank you!

And please enjoy a few of our favorite photos from the 2016 event season

December 9

A banner year for FMR's youngest river stewards

American Indian Magnet School students help with a cleanup

American Indian Magnet School students take pride in keeping their school grounds and neighborhood clean, and keeping all the trash from flowing into the streets and the Mississippi River. Thanks to all of our young river stewards for setting such great examples!

This year, youth from throughout the metro river corridor helped us educate Twin Citians about the connection between our homes and streets to the river, restore important natural areas, and research what works best for local ecological restoration projects. Despite all the thunderstorms, 2016 was a fantastic year for FMR youth programs and accomplishments.

November 15

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