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restoration

Art from invasives: An interview with Kim and Emily

Kim and Emily

FMR volunteers Emily Sauer and Kimberly Boustead, pictured here at one of our volunteer events, spread invasives awareness through art.

FMR volunteers Kimberly Boustead and Emily Sauer remove buckthorn, garlic mustard and more at our stewardship events. And they also use their creativity to spread awareness about how to stop the spread of invasive species. Read more about their favorite river spots, buckthorn berry ink and a new spin on the muscle tee.  >>

February 26

Bird surveys reveal steady increases at FMR prairie restorations

Henslow's Sparrow

Henslow's sparrow is one of the many bird species our FMR breeding bird surveys found on prairie restoration sites. ("Henslow's sparrow" by Jim Hudgins/USFWS. CC BY 2.0)

Our land conservation team not only restores habitat, but monitors that habitat for wildlife data. After years of conducting breeding bird surveys at our prairie restoration sites, we can now see clear trends in increased number of species, especially species of greatest conservation need.  >>

December 7

Habitat in the city: the power of the single yard

Black-capped chickadee on branch

Black-capped chickadees eat insects, some of which have evolved to survive on certain native plants and not others. Without those native plants, chickadee populations decline. (Photo by Patrick Ashley, Creative Commons, Flickr)

Native plants are for the birds! A recent study shows chickadee populations decline in residential yards filled with non-native plants, meaning even your backyard can provide crucial habitat.  >>

November 6

Why do volunteers hand-collect seed for FMR?

Native prairie seed harvested by hand

Volunteers collected this yellow coneflower seed by hand. Hand-harvested seeds help us restore prairie remnants at places like Sand Coulee Scientific and Natural Area in Hastings.

What would you be willing to pay for a few teaspoons of prairie seed? Seeds from native prairie remnants that our volunteers collect by hand are priceless.  >>

October 8

River Heights Park saved, restoration begins!

Residents and River Guardians helped save this park!

Inver Grove Heights residents, including many FMR River Guardians, helped save this park!

After hearing from dozens of community members (including many FMR River Guardians), the Inver Grove Heights city council unanimously voted to save River Heights Park on Monday, May 14. 

The council had been considering carving up and selling the 7.5-acre undeveloped natural area as three 2.5-acre lots for housing developers. Instead, the city, FMR and neighbors are going to work together to make the park more accessible — adding a park sign and bench, with details to be determined — while keeping it a natural area and restoring important bird habitat. >>

September 19

Snapping turtle hatchlings protected from predators

Baby snapping turtle

When born, baby snapping turtles are smaller than a half dollar. (Photo by Mike Krivit)

Our wildlife cameras caught baby snapping turtles hatching in peace thanks to our new wildlife nest enclosure at Spring Lake Islands Wildlife Management Area. >>

September 10

Restoring habitat on an urban island

FMR is beginning restoration and enhancement of the natural areas on the north half of Nicollet Island. Photo by MWMO.

FMR is beginning restoration and enhancement of the natural areas on the north half of Nicollet Island. Photo by MWMO.

After almost two years of planning, FMR is embarking on our Nicollet Island habitat restoration project designed to enhance wildlife habitat, control erosion and improve water quality.  >>

September 10

Wildlife returning to FMR restoration sites

Red-headed woodpecker, baby snapping turtle, chorus frog

If you restore habitat, will wildlife return? Signs — or rather, red-headed woodpeckers, snapping turtles and chorus frogs — point to yes. (Photos courtesy [clockwise] Mike Krivit, WikiMedia, and Tom Reiter.)

This spring, we kept a close eye on our habitat restoration projects to see if they're paying off for wildlife. If our sightings are any indication, we’re certainly on the right track!

Red-headed woodpeckers were spotted in one of our oak savanna restoration areas, tadpoles wriggled in just-created wetland basins, and turtles were quick (relatively) to take advantage of newly built nest protection sites. >>

June 11

Burn, baby, burn...but only when we say so!

An April prescribed burn rolls through a blufftop prairie at the Flint Hills Pind Bend Bluffs property.

A prescribed burn rolls through a blufftop prairie at the Flint Hills Pind Bend Bluffs restoration site. (Photo by Karen Schik.)

Spring has officially sprung, and with it comes those familiar signs of life: plants begin to green, flowers bloom, migrating birds return, and fires burn through the prairies at FMR restoration sites!

Learn more about how we use fire to restore wildlife habitat, and the impact of a recent unplanned fire on an FMR restoration site. >>

May 7

What's your city planning for its riverfront? Find out and weigh in.

View from River Oaks in Cottage Grove

Identifying scenic vistas, like this view of Hastings from Cottage Grove, is an important component of the local river corridor planning now underway.

Cities up and down the metro Mississippi are busy finalizing their local river corridor plans, but there's still time to weigh in. Some deadlines to submit comments are fast approaching, including July 17 for Cottage Grove and July 22 for Minneapolis. Learn where your city's at in its process and how you can have your say in the shape of your future local riverfront. >>

April 9

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