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Volunteer Events

Get outside with FMR!

Two Super Volunteers

Super Volunteers Stacy and Allan. Photo by Anna Botz for FMR.

Believe it or not, March 20th marks the first day of spring! That means we're ramping up for event season and we've got plenty of opportunities for you to get your hands dirty with FMR. Join us to protect and restore local natural areas or rally for the river! >>

March 21

'Make & Take' Rain Barrel Workshop - Just $35!

What's one of the simplest, high-impact ways to save water and help protect our watershed? Using a rain barrel.

Lawn and garden watering typically makes up 40% of total summer household water usage, according to the EPA. Plus, the biggest threat to our waters today is polluted runoff water that runs off our roofs and into our streets and alleys, carrying all the oil, sediment and other contaminants that it picks up along the way into our lakes, rivers and streams.

Tend the rare prairie at Sand Coulee SNA

With its tall grass and wildflowers, the Sand Coulee offers a different kind of beauty. With less than 1 percent of Minnesota native prairie remaining, this highly protected preserve is no less than an oasis in a desert of wildlife habitat –— 14 rare plant and animal species call the Coulee home. And with its deep prairie root systems, the Coulee also help filter pollutants from runoff water before it can enter the nearby Vermillion and Mississippi Rivers. 

Tend the native bluff prairie at Indian Mounds Park

Indian Mounds Park is home to one of the most photographed river views in the metro area. The iconic overlook is also home to a restoration project providing much-needed habitat and biodiversity while protecting the bluff, the views and local water quality.

Tend the demonstration pollinator garden at Camel's Hump Park

Camel's Hump Park and Open Space, located in Cottage Grove, is home to beautiful river views overlooking Highway 61. Join us for this summer worknight in the park as we return to this stunning site to tend to previously planted pollinator patch gardens. These patches provide much-needed concentrated habitat and resources for local birds, bees, butterflies, and other pollinators as well as help beautify this park.

Remove buckthorn near the Vermillion River's South Creek

Located in Farmington, South Creek feeds the Vermillion River, a cold prairie river flowing through the heart of Dakota County and an important tributary of the Mississippi River. Volunteers will work closely with FMR staff and fellow volunteers to remove buckthorn and other invading trees and shrubs or to haul brush to its pick-up spot. Buckthorn is extremely hardy and able to thrive in a variety of soil and light conditions.

Native prairie planting at Cherokee Park

Join FMR staff and volunteers for our first public restoration event at Cherokee Regional Park – one of St. Paul's most visited parks. We will begin work needed to restore this historically oak savanna and maple-basswood forested bluff-top park by planting a mix of native prairie plants. These showy flowers and grasses will not only beautify the park but provide much-needed bee, butterfly and bird habitat. And, with deep root systems that act like filters, they'll help reduce the amount of run-off pollution and secure the soil along the bluff.

Earth Day 2.0: River Gorge Cleanup

Taking place just off of West River Parkway, this cleanup has become an Earth Day tradition in the Minneapolis River Gorge. The orignially scheduled April 21st event was postponed due to our delayed spring but now we're ready to get out, get our hands dirty and cleanup this beautiful spot along the river.

Tend the demonstration prairie at Ole Olson Park

Ole Olson Park in north Minneapolis is known for its top-notch walking and biking trails and stunning skyline views, but we want it to be recognized for even more. Join FMR as we return to this riverfront park to tend an important native demonstration prairie garden along the bike trail. These showy flowers and grasses will not only beautify the park but provide much-needed bee, butterfly and bird habitat. And, with deep root systems that act like filters, they'll help reduce the amount of pollution flowing into the Mississippi River. 

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