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Climate Change

The end of ethanol: Future-proofing Minnesota’s cropland

The electric vehicle transition will happen, and it has huge implications for American farms (not to mention opportunities for water quality). In the electrified world of 2050, demand for corn ethanol will have plummeted, and the agricultural economy will be nothing like the one you know today. If we invest in innovative clean-water crops now, we can improve the long-term outlook for our state’s rural economic prosperity and for our river.   >>

October 1, 2019

Global action on hybrid and electric vehicle commitments

We're tracking the transition to electric vehicles because moving away from ethanol production has major implications for agriculture and therefore water quality. Here's a very brief summary of recent local and global commitments towards electric vehicle incentives, requirements and production goals.  >>

October 1, 2019

Stormwater's hidden perils

As our climate changes and water infrastructure ages, the challenges of water management are becoming more severe. Ultimately, our changing climate means that Minnesota faces more — and more powerful — storms, leading to sewage emergencies, mega-storms, sandbagged lake houses and twelve billion-dollar price tags.  >>

September 28, 2019

Landslides are on the rise in Minnesota

Wetter weather has increased landslides that slough slopes into our roads and rivers, sometimes with dangerous consequences for water and life. A mapping project aims to identify risk areas so we can safeguard our slopes.  >>

August 6, 2019

Self-inflicted brain drain at USDA threatens farm economy

Leaders at the U.S. Department of Agriculture are plowing forward with the relocation of two major research agencies, a move that threatens to push out hundreds of career staffers and undermine scientific inquiry. The country can't afford this setback at a time when the farm economy is threatened from all sides and clear analysis of these threats is paramount.  >>

July 25, 2019

How does FMR evaluate development plans?

Water Street development

Behind the scenes, FMR often meets with developers, stakeholders and government officials to shape development proposals like this one at Water Street next to Harriet Island in St. Paul's West Side neighborhood. (Image by DJR Architecture and Reuter Walton Development)

How does FMR evaluate and advocate for sensitive riverfront development, and what's our take on specific proposals being considered right now? This article gives you a glimpse behind the scenes of our River Corridor program's work.  >>

June 4, 2019

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