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Land Conservation

Ramsey County considers three properties for redevelopment, conservation

The county is making plans for three properties on the east side of St. Paul: The site of a former juvenile correctional facility on undeveloped bluffland holding Dakota history; a golf course that's home to an endangered bumblebee; and a grassland where prairie birds flock. We've encouraged officials to inventory ecological resources and work with those studying the cultural resources before proceeding with planning.  >>

New river access in Cottage Grove?

The former Mississippi Dunes golf course in Cottage Grove has amazing potential to be a new park, but its owners want to develop it into housing. You can weigh in to protect habitat and public river access at this special site.  >>

Volunteer spotlight: Randy's dedication at Ole Olson Park

For Randy Miranda, volunteering every week to tend FMR's prairie restoration at Ole Olson Park near his home was a meditative way to give back and get through the pandemic. Here are Randy's reflections on why he volunteers and what we've accomplished together.  >>

March 31

Opening for 2021 field ecology internship (CLOSED)

Intern planting tree

Field ecology interns have the opportunity to directly assist with conservation, like 2019 intern Phuong Nguyen pictured here at an FMR habitat restoration project.

Find out more about this internship, apply or spread the word.  >>

Cottage Grove Ravine Regional Park

Two volunteers at Ravine Lake

A forested valley with 100-foot high slopes runs into Ravine Lake at this 515-acre park. We’ve been managing oak savanna and prairie habitat restoration here since 2012. (Photo: Karen Schik)

A forested valley with 100-foot high slopes runs into Ravine Lake at this 515-acre park. We’ve been managing oak savanna and prairie habitat restoration here since 2012.  >>

Vermillion Falls Park

Vermillion Falls Park

At the stunning waterfall after which this park is named, the Vermillion River drops 35 feet, then runs through limestone gorge and forest. We've been managing habitat restoration here since 2019. (Photo by Tom Reiter)

At the stunning waterfall after which this park is named, the Vermillion River drops 35 feet, then runs through limestone gorge and forest. We've been managing habitat restoration here since 2019. Find out what's special about this place.  >>

Why insects matter and what you can do about their decline

In the past few years, news of the decline of insect populations has raised alarm bells. Experts say the world is losing around 1 to 2 percent of its insects each year. By now, most people know pollinators are vital to making about a third of our food supply. But what about all the other insects — does this overall population decrease matter?  >>

January 29

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