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Land Conservation

Ecological restoration: A practice in patience

In the world of ecological restoration, changes don't happen overnight. And sometimes, to create a thriving and diverse habitat for wildlife and for water quality, things get a little messier (or even uglier) before they get better. Take the long view with us and check out these before, during and after photos of a few of our restoration projects. >>

August 18

Thanks Akia, our shared summer intern

Akia Vang, our Green Team Alumni summer intern, did a little bit of everything in our office and out in the field, all in two short weeks. (Photo: Tom Reiter and Will Stock for FMR)

Akia Vang, our Green Team Alumni summer intern, woke up early to survey breeding birds and stayed late to assist at volunteer planting events. Akia stayed busy during his two short weeks with us.  >>

July 11

A good sign for habitat: Hastings high schoolers make their mark in the park

Hastings High School students shovel into place the park sign they wrote and designed for Vermillion River Linear Park. Their teacher, Mr. Beattie, has partnered his field biology classes with us to restore natural habitat at this park for five years.

Vermillion River Linear Park is a 60-acre prairie in the heart of Hastings that FMR has worked with students for years to restore. These high school students wanted to make sure passersby knew about the boon to wildlife and water quality right in their backyard. >>

June 11

New podcast features FMR ecologist and invasive earthworms

Wandering Naturalist

The Wandering Naturalist podcast featured FMR ecologist Alex Roth in May. And in June, the featured topic is water, from water quality to water sports. (Image from Three Rivers Park District.)

Three Rivers Park District's new podcast, The Wandering Naturalist, covers fun Minnesota ecology topics from tracking owls to maple syruping. In this episode, FMR ecologist Alex Roth joined the conversation about the effects of invasive buckthorn and earthworms on Minnesota's wildflowers. >>

June 11

New podcast features FMR ecologist and invasive earthworms

Three Rivers Park District's new podcast, The Wandering Naturalist, covers fun Minnesota ecology topics from tracking owls to maple syruping. In this episode, FMR ecologist Alex Roth joined the conversation about the effects of invasive buckthorn and earthworms on Minnesota's wildflowers. >>

June 7

River access, wildlife habitat, year-round recreation: Cottage Grove’s unique opportunity

People enjoying park

A Mississippi Dunes park in Cottage Grove could create access to the river throughout the seasons. (Illustration by Kimberly Boustead and Emily Sauer)

The City of Cottage Grove has the opportunity to turn an old golf course into open space for wildlife and a recreational park for residents and visitors in an area lacking in river access. Here are our top reasons why we should protect this special place from development.  >>

May 25

Meet our elusive, big brown trout

The Twin Cities is home to a rare trophy trout stream known for these not-so-brown trout. (Photo by Latham Jenkins, Circumerro Stock.) 

In a cold prairie river just 20 or so minutes south of St. Paul, large brown trout gather in the shadow of red-twig dogwoods, willows and other stream-side plants. Learn more about these wily and beautiful reminders of the importance of protecting our local waters, and how you can help protect them. (Hint: Volunteer at our Vermillion watershed events on 5/23 and 6/22!) >>

May 15

Fisher spotted at FMR restoration site

One member of the weasel family, the fisher, is more commonly a denizen of Minnesota's north woods than our metro woodlands. Finding a fisher recently at Spring Lake Park Reserve in Dakota County was a rare treat.  >>

April 21

Fisher spotted at FMR restoration site

Fisher in forest

Captured by Dakota County Parks on their wildlife camera at Spring Lake Park, this fisher is active during the day, though fishers are primarily nocturnal. (Photo credit: Dakota County Parks wildlife camera)

One member of the weasel family, the fisher, is more commonly a denizen of Minnesota's north woods than our metro woodlands. Finding a fisher recently at Spring Lake Park Reserve in Dakota County was a rare treat.  >>

April 4

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