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Land Conservation

Meet our elusive, big brown trout

The Twin Cities is home to a rare trophy trout stream known for these not-so-brown trout. (Photo by Latham Jenkins, Circumerro Stock.) 

In a cold prairie river just 20 or so minutes south of St. Paul, large brown trout gather in the shadow of red-twig dogwoods, willows and other stream-side plants. Learn more about these wily and beautiful reminders of the importance of protecting our local waters, and how you can help protect them. (Hint: Volunteer at our Vermillion watershed events on 5/23 and 6/22!) >>

May 15

Fisher spotted at FMR restoration site

Fisher in forest

Captured by Dakota County Parks on their wildlife camera at Spring Lake Park, this fisher is active during the day, though fishers are primarily nocturnal. (Photo credit: Dakota County Parks wildlife camera)

One member of the weasel family, the fisher, is more commonly a denizen of Minnesota's north woods than our metro woodlands. Finding a fisher recently at Spring Lake Park Reserve in Dakota County was a rare treat.  >>

April 4

Minnesota’s coveted native orchids

Orchids

Minnesota has almost 50 native orchids. You can find some wild orchids in our metro area.

Though we certainly don’t live in a tropical climate, our state is home to almost 50 native orchids. If you need a reprieve from the muted winter palette, check out our vivid photos of blooming orchids and learn more about some of Minnesota's loveliest plants.  >>

March 11

Calling all cameras: Citizen science for the Twin Cities Coyote and Fox Research Project

Coyote in snow

A coyote hunts mice in a wintry field. The new Twin Cities Coyote and Fox Research Project seeks your canine sightings like this one. (Photo by Karen Schik for FMR.)

Coyotes and foxes are mostly secretive animals, but sightings of these species are becoming more and more common throughout the Twin Cities Metro Area. Now, a group of researchers and partner organizations (including FMR) are setting out to better understand how these critters use the urban environment, and maybe just dispel some myths along the way. You can help!  >>

February 28

Art from invasives: An interview with Kim and Emily

Kim and Emily

FMR volunteers Emily Sauer and Kimberly Boustead, pictured here at one of our volunteer events, spread invasives awareness through art.

FMR volunteers Kimberly Boustead and Emily Sauer remove buckthorn, garlic mustard and more at our stewardship events. And they also use their creativity to spread awareness about how to stop the spread of invasive species. Read more about their favorite river spots, buckthorn berry ink and a new spin on the muscle tee.  >>

February 26

First buckthorn wreath-making workshop a success

Two workshop participants display their buckthorn wreath creations.

Two workshop participants display their buckthorn wreath creations. (Photo by Shanai Matteson for Water Bar & Public Studio)

For some in the do-it-yourself crowd, wreath-making has become a fun way to create holiday decor. This past December, FMR and two local artists put a unique spin on this DIY theme, hosting an open studio wreath-making event with one big twist… we used invasive buckthorn.  >>

January 7

A rare opportunity to protect 150+ acres on the main stem of the Mississippi

A view of the Mississippi River looking across to Lower Grey Cloud Island from the former site of Mississippi Dunes Golf Links.

A view of the Mississippi River looking across to Lower Grey Cloud Island from the former site of Mississippi Dunes Golf Links. Preservation and restoration of this site could improve habitat for pelicans and other wildlife.

FMR is leading the charge to acquire and restore a once-manicured golf course in Washington County. Learn more about this opportunity and our hope to transform the former golf fairways and putting greens back to their natural state.  >>

January 4

Ecological research and monitoring at FMR

FMR has worked to restore over two thousand acres in the Mississippi River's metro watershed. Our hope is that diverse natural communities of plants and wildlife will return and thrive. And so far, our surveys and studies point to a positive connection between our habitat restoration work and the plants and animals our work is meant to support.  >>

Habitat in the city: the power of the single yard

Black-capped chickadee on branch

Black-capped chickadees eat insects, some of which have evolved to survive on certain native plants and not others. Without those native plants, chickadee populations decline. (Photo by Patrick Ashley, Creative Commons, Flickr)

Native plants are for the birds! A recent study shows chickadee populations decline in residential yards filled with non-native plants, meaning even your backyard can provide crucial habitat.  >>

November 6

Chemical Use Policy

Friends of the Mississippi River’s Land Conservation activities protect and restore biologically diverse natural areas throughout the Mississippi River watershed in the Twin Cities region. These natural areas provide essential habitat for native fauna, like migratory songbirds and insects, upon which our food web relies.

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